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Do I Need to Be Romantic to Write Romance?

9 Mar 2009
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Last week, I had a lunch with an friend acquaintance.  In the midst of discussions about the economy and such, I mentioned I made extra pocket money by writing romance.  She.  Was.  Incredulous.  Not that I could write or get published, but because of the genre.  Her exact words: “Romance?!  How can YOU write romance?  You’re not a romantic person.”

She’s right.  I’m not a romantic.  Jewellery, flowers, poetry?  Blah.  I don’t see the point in weighing myself down with dead animal matter.  All I wear is a necklace with a cross because I’m Roman Catholic and a watch because I’m anal retentive and always need to know the time.  Flowers require maintenance–and they die anyway.  And poetry?  Unless it’s a dirty limerick, it’s wasted on me.

(Of course, most females don’t consider me feminine because I never wanted a pony when I was younger.  While other girls dreamed about brushing out a horse’s mane until it’s silky smooth and shiny, I couldn’t get past the exorbitant cost of stabling and feeding the bloody thing.)

Anyway, I’m not into moonlit walks along the beach, candlelit dinners, or other things Hallmark and 1-800-FLOWERS tell the public they need to do to prove their love for that special someone.  *gag*  I don’t need big, materialistic gestures.  I don’t WANT big, materialistic gestures.  The significant other makes me happy when he notices my printer is running low on paper and goes out to buy me a new box–not a single package, a BOX–of paper or when he comes over in late October to swap my tires because he heard the first snow is going to fall on the weekend.  And while I was pretty much out of commission because of my back, he brought over a stack of Ultimate Spider-Man comics for me to read.  (BTW, I love-love-LOVE Brian Michael Bendis.)  These little gestures are not traditionally considered romantic, but they are thoughtful as hell and mean a lot more to me than a chip of colored glass or a fistful of flowers.

So, I’ll never write a romance where the hero showers the heroine with lavish gifts and they’ll never hold hands and stroll along a beach–unless they’re undercover and conducting surveillance.  Instead, they’ll be thoughtful.  They’ll try to make the other person’s life a little easier, a little happier.  Is that good enough for a romance?

And how do I make me the SO happy?  Tell him I just bought Killzone 2 and baked a carrot cake with real cream cheese icing.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. azteclady permalink
    10 Mar 2009 1:33 PM

    Being thoughtful, paying attention, being considerate to the other’s needs: that’s true romanticism, as far as I’m concerned.

    [My s.o. gave me power tools for our first Valentine, how’s that for romantic? 😀 ]

  2. 14 Mar 2009 7:42 PM

    Aw, a whole box of paper! He’s a keeper.

  3. 17 Mar 2009 9:40 AM

    I love this! Too bad more people didn’t share in your definition of romance. For the record, I do!

  4. 17 Mar 2009 6:09 PM

    @azteclady: Power tools, eh? I think he and I would get along. I’m a sucker for a man who gives practical gifts.

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